Washington State Stay Home, Stay Safe 2 Week Order

Please be sure to refer to the original documents for questions or concerns relating to a specific situation.

“The less time we spend in public, the more lives we will save.”

Governor Jay Inslee

Summary

  • How Long? 3/25/20 – 4/5/20
    • Unless extended
  • You can still safely go outside as long as you remain at least six feet from each other.
  • Essential businesses can remain open if they follow specific sanitation and social distancing policies outlined by the CDC and WA public health.
  • Gatherings are banned
    • regardless of the number of people, public and private

What Does This Mean For Individuals?

You can only leave your home to do one of two things:

  • Essential activities 
    • Obtaining necessary supplies and services 
      • for family or household members and pets
      • such as groceries, food and supplies for household consumption and use
      • supplies and equipment needed to work from home
      • products necessary to maintain safety, sanitation and essential maintenance of the home or residence
    • Engaging in activities essential for the health and safety
      • of family, household members and pets
      • seeking medical or behavioral health or emergency services
      • obtaining medical supplies or medication
    • Caring for someone else
      • a family member, friend, or pet in another household or residence
      • to transport a family member, friend or their pet for essential health and safety activities
      • to obtain necessary supplies and services
    • Engaging in outdoor exercise activities
      • walking, hiking, running or biking
      • ONLY IF appropriate SOCIAL DISTANCING practices are used
  • Employment in essential business services 
    • Healthcare / Public Health sector
    • Emergency Services sector (Law Enforcement, Public Safety and First Responders, Public Works)
    • Food & Agriculture
    • Energy (Electricity, Petroleum, Natural and Propane Gas)
    • Water & Wastewater
    • Transportation & Logistics
    • Communications & Information Technology
    • Critical Manufacturing
    • Hazardous Materials
    • Financial Services
    • For more details, see the Essential Critical Infrastructure Workers list
  • Doesn’t Apply If:
    • If your home/residence becomes unsafe, you are permitted/urged to leave and stay at a safe alternate location (e.g. victims of domestic violence).
  • Doesn’t Apply If:
    • If you are an individual experiencing homelessness, but you are urged to obtain shelter, and governmental and other entities are strongly encouraged to do as much as they can to increase their capacity to help as many people as possible.

What Does This Mean for Gatherings?

Effective midnight on March 25, 2020 until midnight April 6, 2020 (unless extended beyond that date)

  • No public and private gatherings
  • Regardless of the number of people involved
  • doesn’t apply to people who are part of a single household or residential living unit.

What Does This Mean for Businesses?

All non-essential businesses in shall cease operations by midnight March 25, 2020 except for performing basic minimum operations.

All essential businesses are prohibited from operating unless they establish and implement social distancing and sanitation measures established by the United States Department of Labor’s Guidance on Preparing Workplaces for COVID-19 and the Washington State Department of Health Workplace and Employer Resources & Recommendations.

List of Links

The Novel Coronavirus – Key Terms

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The novel coronavirus, or SARS-CoV-2, is the virus responsible for the COVID-19 illness.

What is the novel coronavirus?

Okay, first things first, let’s start with a few key terms to clarify any mixed messages you may be receiving.

Coronavirus: The name given to a family of viruses that cause disease of varying severity in mammals and birds. Viruses from this family can be responsible for the common cold, but other members of this family have caused two large-scale pandemics in the past two decades, sudden acute respiratory syndrome (SARS) and Middle East respiratory syndrome (MERS). Viruses are classified into families based on their structure and genetics, so it’s kind of like coronaviruses are the Mariners.

SARS-CoV-2 (sudden acute respiratory syndrome coronavirus-2 or the novel coronavirus): This is the specific name of the novel viral organism. If we continue our example from above, this would be a specific baseball player (Ichiro, Ken Griffey Jr, etc). It’s novel, or new, because this a virus that our immune systems have never seen before.

COVID-19: This is short for coronavirus disease 2019 and the name of the disease/illness caused by the novel coronavirus that originated in Wuhan, China in 2019.

Epidemic: A sudden increase in the number of cases of a disease above what is typically expected in a given area.

Pandemic: An epidemic that has widespread human infection in multiple countries across the globe.

Signs: Objective measurement to characterize an illness during a physical exam by a healthcare provider (e.g. temperature, respiratory rate, oxygen saturation).

Symptoms: Subjective evidence of an illness or abnormal process occurring in the body and reported by the patient (e.g. fatigue, nausea, anosmia, ageusia, myalgia).

Incubation Period: The time from when someone is infected to when symptoms develop. Based on existing evidence-based research, the incubation period of SARS-CoV-2 and other coronaviruses (e.g. MERS-CoV, SARS-CoV) ranges from 2–14 days. 50% of people will become ill 5 days after infection.

Infectious Period: The time when an infected person, who may not be showing symptoms, can transmit the virus to others. While it varies from person to person, it is typically ~ 7 days.

Molecular test — RT-PCR (Reverse transcription polymerase chain reaction): This is a molecular diagnostic test that identifies the presence of virus in the body through collection of nasopharyngeal, oropharyngeal, or other respiratory specimens by swabbing. The turn-around time for results varies greatly depending on the laboratory doing the test, but the current range is somewhere between 1 and 5 days.

Antibody Test — Serology: Blood test with a turn-around time of typically same day, but sometimes can take a couple of days. Serology is especially important because it may detect previous infections in people who had few or no symptoms.

Antigen test — Rapid: Rapid diagnostic test with a turn-around time of less than one hour. Antigen tests look for specific proteins on the surface of the virus and can diagnose an active infection.


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